Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

Discuss different strategies for any of our player sets

Moderator: Palmtana

  • Author
  • Message
Offline

gbrookes

  • Posts: 5141
  • Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 8:24 am

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostSat Mar 08, 2014 9:14 am

coolhandlewke wrote:I've got a noob question I could really use an answer to. my 1st go round and it seems everybody is running a 4 man rotation except me. not too realistic for a game that relies on realism but that's besides the point. I can change my dance step and draft better next time around. my question is, is there any downside to the 4 man? any increased injury risk? any built up fatigue? you would hope a pitcher on 3 days would fatigue faster and perform worse. thanks


The very widely held view - which I also believe is correct - is that there is no disadvantage of the kinds that you are mentioning. In fact, pitchers with over 200 innings pitched appear to have their injuries limited to 3 games!

HOWEVER, there is one disadvantage to starters who can start every 4th game - their salaries are set somewhat higher than a similar starting pitcher who can only start every 5th game. This salary difference can be substantial.

Personally, I have used SP* starters (every 4th game), but I generally prefer to use non* SP's, and go with a 5 man rotation. I generally prefer the higher value per game from the lower salary cost (i.e. a better pitcher for the same $). Sometimes I even mix in one or two SP* starters with non-* SP's. This is normally frowned upon strategy-wise, due to the $ inefficiency of mixing the 2 types of SPs. But I like to do this sometimes when my divisional opponents have widely different batter preferences, because it helps me to get the best matchup of the right SP versus the right opponent (LHP or RHP, L balanced or R balanced).

Incidentally, if you go to the trouble of planning out your SP starts for the season (I do this sometimes), you'll find that you tend to have more opportunities for "loading" a pitcher versus certain opponents, or "avoiding" starts versus certain opponents, when you use a 5 man rotation. (This point varies each season depending on the particular schedule). With a 4 man rotation, you tend to face a more equal number of divisional opponents with each starting pitcher in the rotation. A 5 man rotation tends to have a more unbalanced pattern of starts versus each opponent, and thus more opportunities for rotation planning.

In ATG player sets, SP's who start every 4th game are far more common. (Historically, this was an accurate representation of reality, even into the early 70's - consider Steve Carlton and Nolan Ryan, as examples). In MLB during the last 20-30 years, your comments on reality vs game are well made.
Offline

coolhandlewke

  • Posts: 150
  • Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2014 4:00 pm

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostSat Mar 08, 2014 2:53 pm

thanks, great answer. I think I can drop my 4th and 5th and upgrade my rotation substantially.
Offline

andycummings65

  • Posts: 9289
  • Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2012 10:42 pm

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostSun Mar 09, 2014 2:20 pm

Geoff, I mix * and non* guys too. Only thing is, if you go with only 5 non* guys, you lose the mix and match opportunities. Many times I've used an expensive * and 4 cheaper non* guys and it works well.
Offline

gbrookes

  • Posts: 5141
  • Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 8:24 am

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostSun Mar 09, 2014 6:26 pm

andycummings65 wrote:Geoff, I mix * and non* guys too. Only thing is, if you go with only 5 non* guys, you lose the mix and match opportunities. Many times I've used an expensive * and 4 cheaper non* guys and it works well.


As crazy as it sounds, this exercise doesn't take that much time, for a 12 team league, and a 5 man rotation with no *SP starters:

1. Estimate/Predict your division rivals' lineups (in a 12 team league, that's 3 division rivals), in terms of L-R vs each of LHP and RHP, and their overall balance, in terms of _L _R or E.

2. Do a chart where the division rivals are on the left side (row headings) and the columns are 5 man starter rotation spots, 1 through 5. So it's a 3 by 5 matrix of possible results - 3 rows and 5 columns.

3. Print out your own team's schedule. Every time your team plays a division rival, put a tick mark in the appropriate box, 1, 2, 3 , 4 or 5, for the place in the 5 man rotation. With a 5 man rotation, game numbers ending in 1 or 6 are the "1" spot, games ending in "2" or "7" are the 2 spot, "3" and "8" are the 3 spot, , "4" and "9" are the 4 spot, and "5" and "10" are the 5 spot. Keep going until you've ticked 72 times - once for every game you play against divisional rivals. Now your 3 by 5 matrix has 72 tick marks scattered in the 15 boxes on the matrix.

4. Look for imbalances in how the starting rotation matches up against divisional rivals. Almost always, one of the rotation spots will have a significant imbalance, where the starter will face 2 teams a lot, and 1 team not very much at all.

5. Now match up your starters - lefties and righties, L balanced and R balanced, against the divisional rivals that they are best suited for. Use the imbalanced starting spots to place the pitchers who are best suited to the 1 or 2 division rivals that they will play against a lot, and who need to avoid the 1 division rival that they won't play much at all, according to the way the schedule matches up against the 5 man rotation spots.

Occasionally, I get a team schedule where the 5 rotation spots play roughly the same number of games against each division rival. But usually there is enough of an imbalance in 2 or 3 rotation spots that you can nicely fit your starters against the right divisional opponents, without needing to tweak the rotation much, or at all, throughout the year. In other words, set it and forget it.

Andycummings, the above strategy has worked very well for me. Sometimes when division rivals change the makeup of their team, I have to adapt the rotation in midseason. Usually, this means dropping a starter and picking up a new one, and then sometimes I time that so that I can tweak the 5 man rotation spots at the same time!

But I have also used the strategy of mixing SP* and non* SP's in order to be able to get the best matchups at any time during the season, as you were saying.
Offline

andycummings65

  • Posts: 9289
  • Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2012 10:42 pm

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostSun Mar 09, 2014 10:25 pm

Right, you can definitely schedule a 5 man non * rotation to take advantage of parks, but, once you start those five guys in a certain order, you are stuck with that rotation order was the point I was making. Drop/adding would help with that situation if you choose to though
Offline

gbrookes

  • Posts: 5141
  • Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 8:24 am

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostSun Mar 09, 2014 11:20 pm

andycummings65 wrote:Right, you can definitely schedule a 5 man non * rotation to take advantage of parks, but, once you start those five guys in a certain order, you are stuck with that rotation order was the point I was making. Drop/adding would help with that situation if you choose to though


Agreed
Offline

Palmtana

  • Posts: 3273
  • Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2012 7:47 pm
  • Location: SoCal

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostSat Mar 22, 2014 1:11 pm

Offline

nhsteven

  • Posts: 156
  • Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 1:07 am

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostWed Apr 09, 2014 11:52 pm

I had a baserunner picked 0ff twice in last night's last game, where the runner in both cases does not have a pickoff chance. Can anybody explain this?
Offline

gbrookes

  • Posts: 5141
  • Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 8:24 am

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostThu Apr 10, 2014 8:52 am

nhsteven wrote:I had a baserunner picked 0ff twice in last night's last game, where the runner in both cases does not have a pickoff chance. Can anybody explain this?


This is from the strat-o-matic game rules, posted on the web at:

http://somonline.wikia.com/wiki/Strat-O ... Game_Rules

In section 29:

(29.2) When runners attempt to steal
When rolling for a lead in the Supplementary Stealing System, also roll the 20-sided die along with the two 6-sided colored dice.
A. If the 20-sided die roll is 3-20, discard the 20-sided die and continue normally with the Supplementary Stealing System. (If a steal is attempted, you will need to roll the 20-sided die again.)
B. If the 20-sided die roll is 1, the runner attempting the lead may be picked off. Refer to the runner's second steal success rating (in parentheses) and roll the 20-sided die again. If the number rolled is less than or equal to the runner's rating, the runner dives back safely, but the runner has failed to achieve his good lead.
If the number rolled is higher than the runner's rating, the runner has been picked off (statistically, this does not count as a time caught stealing).
C. If the 20-sided die roll is 2, there is a possible balk. Refer to the pitcher's balk rating (at the top of the Advanced side of his card) and roll the 20-sided die again. If the number rolled is less than or equal to the balk rating, a balk has occurred and all baserunners advance one base. If the number rolled is higher than the balk rating, the runner dives back safely, but the runner has failed to achieve his good lead.

I highly recommend (re) reading the game rules, for any player. I find it useful myself to keep re-reading these rules from time to time. There's so much to learn about this online game. It's evolved in amazing ways since I first started playing the game in the early 70's.

http://somonline.wikia.com/wiki/Strat-O ... Game_Rules
Offline

nhsteven

  • Posts: 156
  • Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 1:07 am

Re: Strategy Forum/Newbie Advice Thread

PostThu Apr 10, 2014 7:22 pm

Thx
PreviousNext

Return to General Strategy

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest